Snake in the grass.

The slow worm survey produced a young grass snake, probably one of last year’s hatchlings. It was tucked under a  survey mat in Brunts Field, in the warm and dry. It vanished fairly fast after we lifted the mat, but not before DKG took its picture. . Photograph: DKG More reptiles:  

As the summer warms up, keep an eye out for the reserve’s grass snakes.

A grass snake photographed by DKG in the set-aside at the top of Kestrel Field.

As the weather finally warms up, the reserve is buzzing with life.

Ecological Appraisal of the Church Lane site.

We are posting the first part of our comment on RPS’s Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (PEA) of the Church Lane Site for two reasons: firstly the PEA seems particularly ill-informed about the park, the Lambrok and dismissive of their ecological importance; secondly, so that anybody who might like to comment before the public consultation ends on… Continue Reading →

Stinking Willie and Marefart

Ragwort has many common names; in fact some, like stinking willie and marefart, are downright vulgar. Both refer to the plant’s unpleasant smell. Another set of names, staggerwort, stammerwort and sleepy-dose, are about to its toxicity.  Then there is felon weed, swine grass and our personal favourites: scrog and weeby.

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