No Humans!

Here’s a thing worth thinking about over your coffee of a Sunday morning.

The header picture is of the path through the copse between Sleeper Field and Sheep Field.

The tiny flowers of thyme-leaved speedwell (Veronica serpyllifolia) photographed in Cornfield.

Planning changes

Last month the Government announced controversial changes to England’s planning system, which will make it much easier for developers to build new homes and commercial buildings but much more difficult for local councils to deny planning permission in designated areas. The ostensible object of the changes is to speed up development but there is an undeniable political subtext….

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A red tailed bumblebee worker (Bombus lapidarius) collecting nectar and pollen from a meadow cranesbill flower.

Photographed in the park, Friday 11th September.

A Walk In The Park

by Ian Bushell

I had a quick wander round the park this afternoon to see what needs doing, to assess the ragwort situation in the fields, and look at the tree damage done by the wind. There were three Roe Deer under the Owl Oak in the Church Lane field across the Lambrok, where they are planning to build houses..

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Shaggy parasol

There is a group of shaggy parasols, the fruiting bodies of Chlorophyllum rhacodes, just coming up under the first oak tree as you come through the park’s main gate.

Pictures by Suzanne Humphries

Acorns

Oak trees produce thousands of acorns every year. Somebody has worked out that an oak tree can produce ten million acorns over its lifetime. In a good year, they carpet the ground under the tree.

Read on:

Feedback

During lockdown, we noticed more families walking in the park: excited children and their parents, and sometimes grandparents, all eager to get out of the house and take their permitted exercise in our springtime park. As lockdown has eased, the families have stayed; all summer, there have been socially distanced picnickers under the trees and home-schooled children racing wildly through the fields and woods, sometimes with our downloadable activity sheets in their hands.

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Common Darter

By Ian Bushell

A male Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) resting on the wooden footbridge over the Lambrok tributary. At the pond, there were six male Common Darters protecting their own patches and I was lucky enough to get a picture of this pair mating.

A mating pair of common darters photographed near the pond by Ian Bushell.
Header picture: common darter, by Ian Bushell.

Kingfisher

Jay Pickard has sent us a picture of a kingfisher that he took from the Decorated Bridge yesterday.

Thanks Jay.

Swallows, swifts and martins

All summer long, swallows, house martins and swifts have hawked and hunted for winged insects over the park. The swifts have already begun their migration, the swallows will leave next and the house martins will go last of all.

Here is a short video to help you tell the three species apart.

Litter Pickers Inc.

Newspapers, online and off, have been bombarding us with headlines like this one from the Guardian:

Littering epidemic in England

We would just like to say: Not in our park, there isn’t; our park is pristine. Our park goers pick up their litter (and often other people’s litter as well) and put it in the bins.

Thank you.

Pictures by DKG

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