Hibernacula

Build a hibernaculum to help the amphibians and reptiles in your garden through the winter.

More about oak galls

Yesterday’s post about oak apples prompted questions. Here is more information about some of the oak gall wasps that induce oak trees into producing such strange growths.

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Mole

The picture is a cheat, taken from the internet’s public domain. We haven’t seen a mole in the park, only lots of recent molehills in The Arboretum.

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Message from Jude Summers

“I have photos of badgers eating below my bird feeding station which is on the edge of Southwick Country Park, by Lambrok stream. I thought people may like to see them. They’re not great quality but still nice. Cheers.

Thanks Jude; brilliant picture!

A red tailed bumblebee worker (Bombus lapidarius) collecting nectar and pollen from a meadow cranesbill flower.

Photographed in the park, Friday 11th September.

A Walk In The Park

by Ian Bushell

I had a quick wander round the park this afternoon to see what needs doing, to assess the ragwort situation in the fields, and look at the tree damage done by the wind. There were three Roe Deer under the Owl Oak in the Church Lane field across the Lambrok, where they are planning to build houses..

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Acorns

Oak trees produce thousands of acorns every year. Somebody has worked out that an oak tree can produce ten million acorns over its lifetime. In a good year, they carpet the ground under the tree.

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Common Darter

By Ian Bushell

A male Common Darter (Sympetrum striolatum) resting on the wooden footbridge over the Lambrok tributary. At the pond, there were six male Common Darters protecting their own patches and I was lucky enough to get a picture of this pair mating.

A mating pair of common darters photographed near the pond by Ian Bushell.
Header picture: common darter, by Ian Bushell.

Kingfisher

Jay Pickard has sent us a picture of a kingfisher that he took from the Decorated Bridge yesterday.

Thanks Jay.

Swallows, swifts and martins

All summer long, swallows, house martins and swifts have hawked and hunted for winged insects over the park. The swifts have already begun their migration, the swallows will leave next and the house martins will go last of all.

Here is a short video to help you tell the three species apart.

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