Pigeon post

Pigeons are known to have been domesticated for more than 5,000 years. They are mentioned in cuneiform writing on clay tablets dug up in Mesopotamia and in hieroglyphics on the walls of ancient Egyptian tombs. There is a growing belief among archaeologists that pigeons were, in fact, the first birds to be domesticated, more than 10,000 years ago,

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River Day

Under the heading of A Better Biss Approach (ABBA), Wiltshire Wildlife’s Water Team have been conducting a series of events designed to bring the waterways of the Biss Valley to public attention. Yesterday Alice and Nick from the Water Team came to Southwick Country Park for a River Day, to take a group of children and adults dipping in the Lambrok Stream.

Ian Bushell joined them and has sent in this report:

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The Eurasian wren (Troglodytes troglodytes) is one of our commonest birds; it is very widely distributed, with an estimated population of eight million breeding pairs.

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Skippers

Skippers are a family of Hesperiidae in the order of Lepidoptera; because they are diurnal, we generally called them butterflies but many authorities class them as a group intermediate between butterflies and moths. They are called skippers because of their rapid and darting flight.

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Hatch!

Extraordinary little video of an emperor dragonfly hatching into its final adult form.

Published on Jul 31, 2012 by wildvod.
Emperor Dragonfly larvae emerging from the kitchen garden pond at the Tyntesfield National Trust Estate in June 2012.

Large yellow underwing

The large yellow underwing moth does exactly what it says on the box; it is one of the largest of Britain’s moths and is easily identified by its yellow underwings, bordered with black. If disturbed as it rests during daylight, it flashes the bright orange-yellow of its underwings in an attempt to scare off any predators.

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Song Thrush

At least three pairs of song thrushes nested in the park this year. On any clear July evening, especially after rain, it has been possible to walk right round the park’s boundaries and never be out of earshot of a song thrush singing from the top of a tree.

Here is five minutes of a song thrush’s song; listen to it while you check the morning’s news.

Song thrush recorded by David Bisset in Essex

Header picture:- Song thrush by Simon Chinnery [CC BY-SA 4.0]

Identifying dragonflies

Emperor dragonflies (Anax imperator) are the largest of Britain’s Odonata. They are fast, active hunters that rarely come to rest which makes them exceptionally difficult to photograph.

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