A splash of colour in the park

by Simon Knight

It is lovely to finally see flowers and colour arriving in the park, signalling that spring will soon be upon us.

Continue reading

Crocus vernus photographed in the park by Clive Knight. Crocuses are not native to Britain; they were brought here from central and southern Europe, North Africa, the Middle East and China, in the 15th century.

Ten lords a-leaping

On the tenth day of Christmas, here are the extraordinary flowers of lords-and-ladies, the wild arum (Arum maculatum), photographed in the park during April’s lockdown.

Pictures taken in the park by Suzanne Humphries

The tiny flowers of thyme-leaved speedwell (Veronica serpyllifolia) photographed in Cornfield.

A red tailed bumblebee worker (Bombus lapidarius) collecting nectar and pollen from a meadow cranesbill flower.

Photographed in the park, Friday 11th September.

Ragwort again

A version of this post was first published in July of last year.

This year the park produced beautiful hay: a variety of grasses, dry, sweet smelling, full of wildflower and not a single shred of ragwort anywhere. Already, we have turned our attention to pulling and digging the ragwort that might spoil the farmer’s next crop,

Continue reading “Ragwort again”

Field garlic

The extraordinary flowers of Allium oleraceum or field garlic, found growing at the bottom of Kestrel Field.

This is common fleabane (Pulicaria dysenterica); it is a plant that grows all over the place but nobody ever seems to know its name. As the park’s summer wildflowers go to seed, the fleabane is a welcome splash of colour beside the paths.

Continue reading

New species

Wed 15/07/2020 18:48; mail and pictures from Clive Knight

Walking round this afternoon spotted these. The first two pics are of a plant in Sleepers Field – no idea what it is and the bottom pic I found in the pathway through the woods at the top of Village Green. Both single plants.

Sent from my iPhone

Continue reading

Perforate St John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) also known as common St John’s wort.

Header picture taken by Clive Knight, others by Suzanne Humphries

A marbled white (Melanargia galathea) on creeping thistle flowers, photographed in the park yesterday by Julie Newblé. If you look carefully, there are at least three common red soldier beetles hidden in the picture.

Thanks Julie.

The year’s best common spotted orchid, photographed last week by Ian Bushell.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑