Park nightlife

Wildlife photographer Simon Knight has been sneaking up on our badgers. Click the green button for a little peek into the park’s nightlife.

Header picture: badgers at a bird feeder in Lambrok Close: by Jude Summers

Buff tailed bumblebees

The aerodynamically unlikely buff tailed bumble bee queens are out of hibernation and, buzzing around between the park’s spring flowers. Here is a video about their surprising flying skills:

Nesting

At this time of year, the reserve’s blue tits are looking for nest holes in our old trees. The ash tree at Fiveways harbours a nest every year and the newly fenced oak near at the bottom of the Arboretum seems to have attracted more than one pair already.

Here is a video of a female blue tit building a nest while, outside, the male guards the site from marauders and thieves.

Video from The Nest Box
Header picture by Simon Knight

Rooks in February

Before the end of February, the nature reserve’s rooks will have started collecting building materials for their nests. Here is a video that shows us what kind of behaviour to look out for:

Video by Film Studio Aves;
Header picture (CC0) pixabay.com

On the twelfth day of Christmas

The park’s twelve drummers drumming are great spotted woodpeckers. They begin drumming at the end of winter as part of a courtship ritual in which the male marks out his territory and advertises his presence by drumming his beak against hollow wood 10 to 20 times in just 2 seconds, and the females replies briefly as she enters his territory.

Here is a video:

Video recorded in March 2019 by George Ewart

Woodpeckers

We have both greater and lesser spotted woodpeckers on our species lists but it is many years since the single sighting of a lesser spotted woodpecker in the park. Here is a video from the BTO to help you tell the difference between the two.

It’s garden-tidy-up time.

Keep a look out for hibernating amphibians as you tidy up your garden ready for winter. Frogs, toads and newts will find sheltered places to hibernate in hedge bottoms, compost heaps, under stones and in log piles and are best not disturbed. Take particular care if you are planning to clear out a pond: frogs and newts will sometimes overwinter in the mud at the bottom.

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No Humans!

Here’s a thing worth thinking about over your coffee of a Sunday morning.

The header picture is of the path through the copse between Sleeper Field and Sheep Field.

Swallows, swifts and martins

All summer long, swallows, house martins and swifts have hawked and hunted for winged insects over the park. The swifts have already begun their migration, the swallows will leave next and the house martins will go last of all.

Here is a short video to help you tell the three species apart.

Rabbit warren

There are two rabbit warrens in the park: one at the far end of Sleepers and one in the thick bramble hedge that runs alongside the central path from Fiveways to Puddle Corner.

Here is a fascinating video, narrated by Chris Packham, about a rabbit warren.


A short video while we wait for the next sighting of the barn owls in the park:


The snowdrops are opening

The snowdrops in the copse in the southern corner of Village Green are beginning to open.

Video by Neil Bromhall
Header picture taken in the park by DKG


Here’s one of last year’s posts from snowdrop time:

Hatch!

Extraordinary little video of an emperor dragonfly hatching into its final adult form.

Published on Jul 31, 2012 by wildvod.
Emperor Dragonfly larvae emerging from the kitchen garden pond at the Tyntesfield National Trust Estate in June 2012.

Here is a fascinating little video of a peacock butterfly emerging from its chrysalis. We know that there are at least two nests of peacock caterpillars in the park so, by the end of July, we should see these beautiful adults.

Filmed and edited by Daniel Castell

Spotting tawny owls

Has anybody heard or seen the tawny owl that was spotted in the park three weeks ago? We are hoping it is still here, perhaps with a mate, looking for nest sites.

Tawny owl calls are unmistakeable, the classic too-wit-too-woo, but their camouflage is excellent and they are difficult to spot against a background of tree bark. Here is a short video from YouTube to help with identification.

Contact details, if you have anything to report, are here.

More about tawnies:

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